If you’re an online college student, and it seems like all the homecoming parades, campus parties, and coffee-shop cramming sessions are reserved for traditional colleges students, we’ve got a special Thanksgiving treat for you. We’re serving up a cornucopia stuffed to its wicker capacity with tasty tips to make any online college student thankful.
A good understanding of the coursework and expectations of the professors is crucial to passing and making good grades in any given course. Since in-person communication is not an option, make use of email, chats, forums, and other formats to communicate with fellow students and professors if you have any questions and need any clarification. In this way you can avoid misunderstandings from the outset, greatly enhancing your online college success.

The leaders of Harvard College (which granted America's first degrees in 1642) might have thought of their college as the first of many residential colleges that would grow up into a New Cambridge university. However, over time, few new colleges were founded there, and Harvard grew and added higher faculties. Eventually, it changed its title to university, but the term "college" had stuck and "colleges" have arisen across the United States.
College of the Mainland is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate degrees and certificates. Contact the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of College of the Mainland.
Stay proactive in your class as well as with your classmates. Ask questions and participate as much as you can. There are so many great opportunities as an online learner because the students in your class are usually from all over the United States. As a student, you are able to draw information and gain more knowledge and different perspectives than you may in a face-to-face classroom setting.

It might be awkward, but please don't scroll past this. We'll cut to the chase: This Wednesday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. 98% of our readers don't give; they simply look the other way. If you are an exceptional reader who has already donated, we sincerely thank you. If you donate just $2.75, Wikipedia could keep thriving for years to come. Most people donate for a simple reason—because Wikipedia is useful. If Wikipedia gave you $2.75 worth of knowledge this year, take a minute to donate. Show the volunteers who bring you access to reliable, neutral information that their work matters. Thank you.
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