Despite what some students may think, online colleges are no less challenging than traditional colleges. Depending on a student's learning style, keeping up with online work may actually prove to be more demanding for some. When asked about the greatest challenges they face while studying online, a majority of students in a Learning House survey cited motivation, attention, and focus as their main concerns.
Strive to become Benjamin Franklin 2.0. Our founding sage’s morning question was “What good shall I do this day?” and dinner question was “What good have I done today?” Just imagine if he’d had Google Calendar to plan his whole day out... In general, use technology to your advantage. Find an effective system to manage and sort your email because otherwise you’ll get overwhelmed.
For us onlooking or partaking upperclassmen, that feeling isn’t too distant. As a freshman, the sense of being lost in a big new world was exciting, but at the same time I treasured every bit of advice I could get. And there are still many things I wish I would have known then. Now that I’m a few years older, I thought I’d share some thoughts. More importantly, I went around and asked some of the most accomplished Penn students for what recommendations they’d give to freshmen.
The important thing is sleep. We as human adults need seven to eight hours of sleep to function. I understand that the need to cram all knowledge before a quiz is a well-known idea of college but studying is key. I am not talking about studying the night before, but possibly the month before. The night before a quiz should be dedicated to a good meal and sleep. When the brain is asleep, the mind can think clearly and go over past studying tips.
Dedicate a specific amount of time each day or each week to studying and commit to it. A lot can come up in life, and there will always be many distractions. If you are a morning person, then wake up an hour earlier and spend some time studying. If you are a night owl, then dedicate some of that Facebook and Instagram time on an evening to studying.
Ok, that aside, if you’re a student with four days off, this is truly something to be grateful for. This holiday is a sumptuous engagement of the senses. But it goes fast. I think we can all agree that the Monday after Thanksgiving break is always the coldest and darkest morning ever. I only bring it up because as soon as this little vacation is over, you’re wrapped up in the final leg of your marathon semester.
Presently in Portugal, the term colégio (college) is normally used as a generic reference to a private (non-government) school that provides from basic to secondary education. Many of the private schools include the term colégio in their name. Some special public schools – usually of the boarding school type – also include the term in their name, with a notable example being the Colégio Militar (Military College). The term colégio interno (literally "internal college") is used specifically as a generic reference to a boarding school.
In a survey of more than 2,000 college students in 33 states and 156 different campuses, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group found the average student spends as much as $1,200 each year on textbooks and supplies alone. By comparison, the group says that's the equivalent of 39 percent of tuition and fees at a community college, and 14 percent of tuition and fees at a four-year public university.[38]
A sixth form college or college of further education is an educational institution in England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Belize, the Caribbean, Malta, Norway, Brunei, or Southern Africa, among others, where students aged 16 to 19 typically study for advanced school-level qualifications, such as A-levels, BTEC, HND or its equivalent and the International Baccalaureate Diploma, or school-level qualifications such as GCSEs. In Singapore and India, this is known as a junior college. The municipal government of the city of Paris uses the phrase "sixth form college" as the English name for a lycée.[3]
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