Pull yourself away from the computer. Have a huge meal with friends and family. Then, have a bunch of awesome leftover-turkey sessions. Avoid online libraries and lecture videos. Watch a parade, sleep late, or relax with a crossword puzzle. The important thing is that you take a reprieve from your daily routine. We even made a mixtape to get you in a grateful mood. Give yourself this time to be replenished…especially because after turkey and pumpkin pie, Final Exams are the next thing on the menu.
The chief men of the city, who waited for us on the shore, accompanied us through a crowd of people, whom curiosity had drawn from all parts of our college. Though our place of residence at Diou is one of the most beautiful in all the Indies, we stayed there only a few days, and as soon as we had recovered our fatigues went on board the ships that were appointed to convoy the northern fleet.
In Hong Kong, the term 'college' is used by tertiary institutions as either part of their names or to refer to a constituent part of the university, such as the colleges in the collegiate The Chinese University of Hong Kong; or to a residence hall of a university, such as St. John's College, University of Hong Kong. Many older secondary schools have the term 'college' as part of their names.
In Canadian English, the term "college" usually refers to a trades school, applied arts/science/technology/business/health school or community college. These are post-secondary institutions granting certificates, diplomas, associate's degree, and in some cases bachelor's degrees. In Quebec, the term is seldom used; with the French acronym for public colleges, CEGEP (Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel, "college of general and professional education") is more commonly used. CEGEP is a collegiate level institutions in Quebec, that a student typically enrols in if they wish to continue onto university in the Quebec education system.[note 1], or to learn a trade. In Ontario and Alberta, there are also institutions which are designated university colleges, as they only grant undergraduate degrees. This is to differentiate between universities, which have both undergraduate and graduate programs and those that do not.
Some online classes ask you to post a picture of yourself that your classmates can see on your online class. I have seen some doozies, including shots that almost look pornographic. Please remember that your online class is not a model shoot where you get to show off your assets. Oh, and that also includes posting a picture of your dog’s face instead of yours.
The term college is mainly used by private or independent secondary schools with Advanced Level (Upper 6th formers) and also Polytechnic Colleges which confer diplomas only. A student can complete secondary education (International General Certificate of Secondary Education, IGCSE) at 16 years and proceed straight to a poly-technical college or they can proceed to Advanced level (16 to 19 years) and obtain a General Certificate of Education (GCE) certificate which enables them to enrol at a University, provided they have good grades. Alternatively, with lower grades the GCE certificate holders will have an added advantage over their GCSE counterparts if they choose to enrol at a Poly-technical College. Some schools in Zimbabwe choose to offer the International Baccalaureate studies as an alternative to the IGCSE and GCE.
The constituent colleges of the former University of New Zealand (such as Canterbury University College) have become independent universities. Some halls of residence associated with New Zealand universities retain the name of "college", particularly at the University of Otago (which although brought under the umbrella of the University of New Zealand, already possessed university status and degree awarding powers). The institutions formerly known as "Teacher-training colleges" now style themselves "College of education".
What has been incredibly helpful to me is setting aside ‘school time’. This has been essentially my savings grace. I treat my online classes as if they are a traditional classroom setting. Three times a week I ‘go to school’. I literally block off a two hour window to complete homework, participate in online discussions with my classmates, and also study. I don’t allow myself to be ‘late’ to school or to reschedule class time in light of social events, activities, or anything else that could easily become a diversion.

The constituent colleges of the former University of New Zealand (such as Canterbury University College) have become independent universities. Some halls of residence associated with New Zealand universities retain the name of "college", particularly at the University of Otago (which although brought under the umbrella of the University of New Zealand, already possessed university status and degree awarding powers). The institutions formerly known as "Teacher-training colleges" now style themselves "College of education".


Some American universities, such as Princeton, Rice, and Yale have established residential colleges (sometimes, as at Harvard, the first to establish such a system in the 1930s, known as houses) along the lines of Oxford or Cambridge.[33] Unlike the Oxbridge colleges, but similarly to Durham, these residential colleges are not autonomous legal entities nor are they typically much involved in education itself, being primarily concerned with room, board, and social life.[34] At the University of Michigan, University of California, San Diego and the University of California, Santa Cruz, however, each of the residential colleges does teach its own core writing courses and has its own distinctive set of graduation requirements.
In the United States, there are over 7021 colleges and universities.[28] A "college" in the US formally denotes a constituent part of a university, but in popular usage, the word "college" is the generic term for any post-secondary undergraduate education. Americans "go to college" after high school, regardless of whether the specific institution is formally a college or a university. Some students choose to dual-enroll, by taking college classes while still in high school. The word and its derivatives are the standard terms used to describe the institutions and experiences associated with American post-secondary undergraduate education.

The term college also applies to distinct entities that formally act as an affiliated institution of the university, formally referred to as federated college, or affiliated colleges. A university may also formally include several constituent colleges, forming a collegiate university. Examples of collegiate universities in Canada include Trent University, and the University of Toronto. These types of institutions act independently, maintaining their own endowments, and properties. However, they remain either affiliated, or federated with the overarching university, with the overarching university being the institution that formally grants the degrees. For example, Trinity College was once an independent institution, but later became federated with the University of Toronto. Several centralized universities in Canada have mimicked the collegiate university model; although constituent colleges in a centralized university remains under the authority of the central administration. Centralized universities that have adopted the collegiate model to a degree includes the University of British Columbia, with Green College and St. John's College; and the Memorial University of Newfoundland, with Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.
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