For some of you, online college is more than just a convenient and flexible way to study. For some, it’s the only way. Whether you’re remotely stationed on a military assignment or balancing your online degree with the responsibilities of parenting; whether you’re working to advance your credentials without taking time off from work or you’re managing a disability that makes travel difficult, online college can be an amazing portal to opportunity. Check out our tips for unique student demographics and make sure you’re getting the most out of your online degree program.
Our guides to online college programs discuss key considerations for students, such as researching school accreditation, paying for tuition, and determining a major field of study. We also provide directories that allow prospective learners to browse online undergraduate and graduate programs in different fields. Read on to learn more about online college opportunities.
Appreciate your summers and use them wisely. Don’t let the system brainwash you into thinking that you need to do something this summer to get that internship next summer, which will lead to that other internship and then That Job. Travel to Japan or Patagonia, write a book, read, spend time with family, learn a new language or skill, follow things that interest you, that cliché but wise voice in your heart.
The first liberal arts and sciences college in India was C. M. S. College Kottayam, Kerala, established in 1817, and the Presidency College, Kolkata, also 1817, initially known as Hindu College. The first college for the study of Christian theology and ecumenical enquiry was Serampore College (1818). The first Missionary institution to impart Western style education in India was the Scottish Church College, Calcutta (1830). The first commerce and economics college in India was Sydenham College, Mumbai (1913).

college education → études fpl supérieures college of education, college of further education, technical college, college student, college graduate, college professorcollege-bound [ˈkɒlɪdʒbaʊnd] adj (US) college-bound student → élève mf qui se destine aux études universitairescollege graduate n → diplômé(e) m/f, licencié(e) m/fcollege of education n → école normalecollege of further education n → centre m de formation continuecollege professor n → professeur m d'universitécollege student n (= university student) → étudiant(e) m/f
In the United States, "college" may refer to a constituent part of a university or to a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, but generally "college" and "university" are used interchangeably,[1] whereas in the United Kingdom, Oceania, South Asia, Southern Africa, most of Europe and Africa, and Canada, "college" may refer to a secondary or high school, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications, a higher education provider that does not have university status (often without its own degree-awarding powers), or a constituent part of a university (See this comparison of British and American English educational terminology for further information).
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