In a lot of ways, online college is quite different than traditional college. Whether you’re earning an associate, bachelor’s, or master’s degree online, you can attend class from anywhere, work on your own schedule, and wear whatever you want—even those zebra-striped cargo pants that you know look awful but are super comfortable and have tons of convenient pockets. So life for online students is a little different. But there is one thing we all have in common, whether we’re taking classes online or on campus—Thanksgiving Break. That’s right. Whether you attend lectures in person or log-in to videoconference with your professor, this is a time of year when we all get a few days off to reflect on the things we’re thankful for.
I have found the best way to study is to break the information down. It is easier to retain small amounts of information at a time and is not as time consuming. You do not feel as though you are "cramming". I can divide my time up on each section which ultimately puts me in control of what I am studying and prevents the studying from taking over me. Small breaks in between sections allow me to refresh my brain and give me the extra boost to continue on.

In the United States, "college" may refer to a constituent part of a university or to a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, but generally "college" and "university" are used interchangeably,[1] whereas in the United Kingdom, Oceania, South Asia, Southern Africa, most of Europe and Africa, and Canada, "college" may refer to a secondary or high school, a college of further education, a training institution that awards trade qualifications, a higher education provider that does not have university status (often without its own degree-awarding powers), or a constituent part of a university (See this comparison of British and American English educational terminology for further information).

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